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the heat of the debate, to election night, the political divide wydened. the u.s. re-examined its role abroad and a second term president claimed it. we look ahead to what happens next with michael duffy of "time" magazine. john harwood of cnbc and the "new york times." doyle mcmanus of the "los angeles times" and karen tumulty of "the washington post." >> covering history as it happens. live from our nation's capital. this is "washington week" with gwen ifill, produced in association with national journal. corporate fuppeding for "washington week" is provided by -- -- corporate funding for "washington week" is provided by -- >> wherever our trains go, the economy comes to life. norfolk southern, one line, infinite possibilities. >> we know why we're here, to chart a greern path in the air and in our factories. >> to find cleaner, more efficient ways to power flight. >> and harn es -- harness our technology for new energy solutions. >> the people of boeing are looking to tomorrow to build a better tomorrow. >> that's why we're here. >> additional corporate funding is provided by -- pru
to intervene. we begin, of course, with election 2012. >> thank you, new hampshire. tonight we made history. he is the worst republican in the country to put up against barack obama. >> if you've got a business, you didn't build that. >> president obama promised to begin to slow the rise of the oceans and to heal the planets. my promise is to help you and your family. >> when you pick up that ballot to vote, you will face the clearest choice of any time in a generation. >> there are 47% of the people who will vote for the president no matter what. 47% who are with him. >> i have just called president obama to congratulate him on his victory. >> and whether i earned your vote or not, i have listened to you. i have learned from you. and you've made me a better president. >> when a president is seeking a second term voters have clear options, stay the course or throw the bum out. so what 2012, karen in the end, was it a referendum or a choice? that's the question that we kept having. >> it was the exact question we kept asking a year ago. given the state of the economy, given how most people felt
of victory -- >> barack obama has been reelected the 44th president. >> the agony of defeat. >> this election is over, but our principles under. >> the year 2012 in review. >> the supreme court has upheld the requirement that every american by insurance. >> the year of the cliffhanger. >> raising tax rates is unacceptable. >> of natural disasters. >> it is like the apocalypse. >> and human tragedies. >> they are saying someone is shooting in the auditorium. >> of political fumbles. >> i have five seconds before you interrupted me. >> and shoppers. >> the seriousness of having a cia director involved in an extramarital affair cannot be overplayed. >> as we look back, let's begin with the top political story of the year -- the reelection of president barack obama. as "time"'s magazine cover states -- the president was person of the year -- barack obama will be the first democrat in more than 75 years to win a majority of the popular vote twice. mitt romney has to be asking himself, given the magnitude of the president's problems and the great numbers of americans who believe that the country wa
, the presidential election the main event, starting with eight serious republican candidates vying for the nomination. ethnic voters flexed their political muscle, giving president obama an unexpectedly early election night win over republican rival mitt romney. california's public education system was saved from severe budget cuts with the november passage of governor brown's proposition 30, but voters didn't say yes to all taxes. an attempt to tax soda in richmond failed, as did a statewide tobacco tax on the june ballot. new districts drawn by a citizens commission and the voter-approved top two primary system shook up races for congress and the state legislature, putting a record number of freshmen in the assembly and giving democrats a rare supermajority in sacramento. it was the beginning of realignment of the state's criminal justice system, and voters approved reform of the state's tough three strikes sentencing law. the economy sputtered but finally showed signs of improvement in the housing and job market, but in silicon valley, the highly anticipated facebook ipo fell fl
obama weighed down by a jobless rate higher than any incumbent seeking re-election since fdr win 323 electoral votes, sweep 8 of 9 battleground seats? as the republican party picks up the pieces and looks ahead to 2016, here are lessons hopefuls from both parties might want to keep mind. if you don't define yourself, your opponent will do it for you. romney let the president's early attacks on his personal wealth and business background go largely unanswered. romney's campaign argued after a long and expensive primary, they had to choose how to spend at the time, limited funds, and they had to claim it was better than defenses of his personal record. in the end, obama beat romney by ten points. on the economic values question that was this, which candidate is more in touch with people like you. 53% said romney's polauolicies d favor the rich. just 10% said that about the president's policies. and romney, the first republican nominee in the history of our poll to go into a convention with his personal rating under water and campaign with a painful number, just 47% of voters viewing hi
because he's not worried about the general election. he's worried about a primary election like a rand paul. >> and the other -- >> by the way, he is from rand paul's state. it's possible. >> he is. the other thing to keep in mind is boehner's speakership vote is up on january 3rd. >> but you -- everybody keeps saying that, but to vote against the speaker who is the caucus nominee, let's face it, he is the nominee of the republican party. to not vote for the speaker is a major act of betrayal on the part of any member of the congress. you have to that day -- >> the idea if he goes and forces through a tax increase, they could express their dissatisfaction, their unhappiness, by not voting for him for speaker. it takes a majority of the full house for him to get elected. a couple dozen of those guys -- >> i know this stuff. >> for the sake of the viewers. >> but for the sake of me, there used to be a sense of doing the right thing, and by the time you're the party nominee for speaker, you vote for the party nominee for speaker. you don't just screw around with this thing because that wo
. do not vote for any incumbent, period. host: we are two years out from the next election. you say if this thing does not work, star of the campaign not to vote of the incumbents? caller: start it now. start the campaign now. they want to start campaigning earlier and earlier, we as the american people need to send a message now that if you cannot do it, if you cannot do your job, then we do not want you there. host: john in south carolina on the line for democrats. caller: the morning. listen very carefully. some of these people, they are all about money. ever since they are in office, some more against him. if i was the president and they do not do their job, i would come to the american people and say, listen, let's spend enough money to pay ourselves out of debt and start from scratch. all of those jobs will come back from china because the dollar will not be worth. that is what is it is a bout. host: on the front page of "the financial times." we also have a tweet. this is what the senate minority leader said yesterday on the floor after his meeting at the white house. [video
. it was days before the 1960 election and she thought i should see it. so she put me on top of a mailbox on this huge boulevard and i watched as this canyon filled in with people. and this very charismatic young man -- i was hooked. i did not know what he was saying. i did not understand what he was saying. how was not that precocious. and i knew it was very important. it was very exciting. now i know from google what he said and part of what he said was i am not running on a platform that says if you elect me things will be easy. being an american 6 in 1960 is very hazardous but with hope we will decide which path we take. i thought back at those words over the last four years because it was parallel to another young candidate. jesse barry had a very difficult life as she had hoped for the future. and i think about what she would have thought, knowing that that little boy shook on the mailbox would be working for the president and that president would be named barack obama. it is incredible. >> politics was a part of the conversation on a regular basis with your parents? >> yes. that wa
. in the last week of the election, the obama campaign paid $550 for a single ad in raleigh, north carolina. the romney campaign had to sell out $2,665. the obama campaign bought it way ahead of time. lesson two, the republican brand needs a hard look. the gop favorable rating underwater for two years. it's been nearly five years and the final poll, full poll before the election, just 36% of registered voters said they had a positive view of the republican party. 43% held a negative view. the democratic party's favorable rating in positive territory. though just barely at 42%-40%. more than 20 republican primary debates put immigration on full display. so now as the party debates to modernize, it has to repair the image. and that leads us to lesson three. demographics are destiny. romney won a higher percentage of the white vote than any candidate since ronald reagan in 1994 beating obama among white voters. by 14 points among white women. five points among independents. he won all the groups by more than george w. bush did in 2004. but he lost the election by a wider margin than john kerry
the government, the government suggested you can have our election with them are in the class, and they did a film, and it's absolutely priceless. i mean, the parents, they didn't have to do it because the teachers were not shy to do it. they would make this mistake or that little thing and they would have this comical elements but the students got interested. they got interested. they ended up collecting a monitor. i'm how good the monitor was. but it was all right. it was all right. and so there are ways i think, which are more likely to think of that i am. of taking these different ideas and say try to settle here or try it out over there. you are building the bar, and it's true that there are, none of these things, everything has its drawbacks. move along. >> final two questions. this gentleman right here, and back their. >> ninety. i've been involved in studying practicing chinese law for the last 45 years. i just want to say on a positive note you, justice breyer and also i think others talked and plenty differently which about changing a legal culture in china. and it wanted to menti
at an election rally. no one has ever been convicted of her killing. thousands of people are gathering at the family mausoleum for a commemoration. thursday's events are expected to launch the political career of her son. elections are expected in the next. few next he is the co-chairman of the pakistan people's party along with his father. he is still too young at 24 to stand as the age limit is 25. he's expected to head up a reelection campaign for the ppp. of joining me is our correspondent who's been following events in islamabad. much depends on what is said today and how the public response to him as to whether he will be a hit or miss. >> indeed. it should also not be forgotten that the performance of the pakistan people's party has not convinced the people across the country that the country is going towards financial bankruptcy and the fact that the ppp has already lost one prime minister who was sent home on contempt of court charges, regarding the swiss authorities. a lot of people will be working carefully. it will be an uphill task for the pakistan people's party to regain
is going to require elected officials to do their jobs. the housing market is recovering, but that could be impacted if folks are seeing smaller paychecks. the unemployment rate is the lowest it's been since 2008. but already, you're seeing businesses and consumers starting to hold back, because of the dysfunction that they see in washington. >> the president's stern statement echoed the concerns of the american people, who are tired of washington gridlock. >> outside of washington, nobody understands how it is, that this seems to be a repeat pattern, over and over again. ordinary folks, they do their jobs. they meet deadlines. they sit down and they discuss things and then things happen. if there are disagreements, they sort through the disagreements. the notion that our elected leadership can't do the same thing is mind boggling to them. and needs to stop. so, i'm modestly optimistic that an agreement can be achieved. nobody's going to get 100% of what they want. but let's make sure that middle class families and the american economy and, in fact, the world economy, aren't adversely im
for us. but it all started about two days before election day. i had this realization that this was a possibility. this could actually happen. i went to the door of rabin's office and said, what if all of these major offices were held by women? this would be historic. we should do any event if it happens. so, as my friends now, my family, i am a self-proclaimed news and political junkie. on election night and had the tv, my laptop, and my i found, i was watching as the results came in. and it was happening. it happened. so yes, there were phone calls, there were e-mails, logistics', food selection, printing, tables, chairs, all the logistics. how this event king together is a question -- what if? what if we could get them. and i am so happy that we have. i am sure all of them will agree that type of vision is what put all of these five women where they are today. that question -- what if? today's event is bigger. it is bigger than political parties, bigger than politics. bigger than the chamber of commerce. today it is history in the making. it is not just a raised gla
. he won by 20 point with whites, he won with women, 56% to 42%. but he lost the election, why? as the obama campaign predicted, the white portion of the electoral dropped. the president carried nearly 8 in 10 non-white voters including 71% of latinos, 73% of asian voters, a whopping 93% of black voters. it remains a real question whether the democratic nominee no 2016 will be able to hold the coalition closer. finally, lesson four. don't ignore the data. the polls matter, more of them are right than wrong. though public polling in the swing states showed the president ahead, the romney campaign sincerely believed until election day that romney would win. why? romney's pollsters assumed the electoral would be wider and older than it turned out to be. the enthusiasm numbers did favor them, but they didn't have enough voters. more than any cycle in recent memory, many republicans bought into an alternative poling universe. in 2016, much of the emphases in both parties will be to match and improve on the obama campaign's data-driven technological juggernaut. at the same time the l
the way for elections to be held as early as february. mario monti has promised to hand in his resignation -- or had promised to hand in his resignation as soon as parliament passed a 2013 budget, which he led his -- kept his promise. he led a government of technocrats for the past year. europeans had held his economic reforms, but voters have been less impressed with his austerity measures. for more on this now, we are joined now on the phone by our correspondent. what now? >> the president will be consulting with the leaders of political parties over the next day or so. to get their advice as we head towards elections, and he is expected then to dissolve parliament and call elections february 24. that is the date people believe most likely will be the date of the vote. >> what is the move of italians right now? would berlusconi actually have any chance with voters? >> the extraordinary thing is that despite his being really comprehensively discredited in the eyes of the rest of the world, a lot of italians seem prepared to fall for his charm and his promises, and he is actually on a medi
an important role in the presidential election. for the first time ever, there were no white protestants on either ticket. although there wasn't a lot of god talk from president obama or mitt romney, grassroots religious groups were active on both sides. evangelical voters were divided during the primary season, but in the end, they rallied around romney, despite some concerns about voting for a mormon candidate. still, their support didn't put him over the top. obama narrowly won the catholic vote, thanks to a strong showing among latino catholics. the u.s. catholic bishops waged an active campaign against the obama administration's decision to require employers, including many faith-based employers, to provide free coverage of contraceptive services. the bishops said that would be a violation of religious freedom. the administration tried to offer a compromise, but the bishops, joined by many evangelical groups, said the compromise didn't go far enough. several religious institutions filed legal challenges to the policy. this summer, the bishops organized what they called a "fortnight
>> brown: seven weeks after election day, there are open seats in congress. we look at contests in three senate races. >> ifill: fred de sam lazaro profiles a priest who became a doctor to help haiti's poor and orphaned children. >> brown: and we close with a conversation with the editor of a new anthology of verse: 100 poems written over 100 years. >> it doesn't have poetry. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: gunfire tore at the nation's holiday mood again today, with the emotional wounds from a school massacre still fresh. there were more fatal shootings, inclu
? because end of february are these elections. >> yes. the elections are, of course, more the campaign heading into the elections with all these noises, especially the end ecb noises that we hear from italy. that's going to cause concern that if italy does need help, how likely are they going to be to get it? in the years from 1993 to 2007 italy brought down its debt to gdp ratio to almost 100% and half of that time berlusconi is prime minister. it's not like berlusconi has a record of fiscal spending. >> no. but i guess also the times were different. >> the times were different but the interest rate was slightly higher than it is now. but the primary surplus of the country ran over that period which was an acceptable 3% on average is already right now reached once again. so all the parameters are in the right place and the only thing the next government needs to do is actually nothing. if it does nothing, if it doesn't reverse the reforms -- >> what's interesting is what berlusconi is campaigning on is austerity. he's running on an ant anti-austerity pro eu package. while it's untenab
their elections back in november. you of course did not. so it is possible that between november and now, like a normal human being, you were not paying all that much attention 20 what washington has been up to. it's the end of the year. things have slowed down. we're waiting for a new congress to come in. usually you would have time to get your bearings to figure out where the bathrooms are. that is not going to be the case this year. not with the fiscal cliff. luckily for you, we here at "the rachel maddow show," we have been paying attention. we have had absolutely no other choice, unfortunately. and we are here to help you and everyone else trying to figure out how we got to this point we are in. right after that election, the day after the election, in fact, your new colleagues got to work immediately on the cliff. the day after the collection, republican house speaker john boehner put out this stirring call to action. >> mr. president, this is your moment. we're ready to be led. not as democrats or republicans but as americans. we want you to lead. not as a liberal or conservative but as
. >> the bay area's newly elected congressman getting plenty of advice on his way to washington. what he says he can teach the old guard about compromise. >> new at 10, a police officer arrives home to find he's become a crime victim. three burglars caught in the act of stealing the policeman's guns. christin ayers on what happened next. >> reporter: police say burglaries in this area have become so widespread that even cops have become targets. >> we do have a lot of law enforcement folks that live in our city. they are the victims of burglaries. >> reporter: most recently last night. three burglars already ransacking a police officer ice home here in southeast ann tee job when the officer came home. >> interrupted the burglary and three subjects fled out of the back of the home. >> reporter: the officer chased them but was forced to stop when they fired a warning shot in the air. months ago an officer who lived in brentwood shot and injured a suspected burglar. it did not appear the officer in yesterday's burglary was targeted. >> it appears to be completely random. like many cities in the
to overcome it in this election. i worry about the future. not every candidate will have the particular advantages barack obama that had in his ability to raise money. >> another question from this side? >> there seems to be a growing consensus or perception that, unlike past democratic president, president obama has not left a ideological format of what it means to be a democrat. there is -- there has been a fear that with the party going so big and republicans moving to the right, there could be a battle for the soul of the party in the next four or eight years. do you see a post-obama age -- a civil war-like occasion happening? >> we just pushed the post-obama age off by four years. [laughter] >> i know. even in the next four years? >> what this president stands for -- i talked earlier about the fight we had. i was reading a book some of you may have read that was excellent about clarence darrow. he talked about some of the fights in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. during the gilded age and the progressive era. so much of the dialogue -- there were differences, but the fundam
telling than just what one election result might suggest. >> well, i think it certainly does and it gives him a certain platform and credibility that perhaps he didn't have before. but watching as these fiscal cliff negotiations have gone through the holidays, it certainly is perhaps a little bit more of a bully pulpit for the president and for his position on taxes. but i think the biggest story of the year came at the end of the year in the past week or so which is the massacre at sandy hook elementary school in newtown and i think the presidency now might be shaped by those events and those are the stories that both barnicle and andrea have chose n as the top story. would you agree this could be a signature for the second term? >> i to do. i do agree with that. i think the events of a few days ago in newtown, connecticut, will help shape a good portion of the president's second and final term in office. i think it gives us a huge impe it tus to changes in this country that had had taken too long to take hold. i think the presidency itself, i think the man himself was shaped and altered
shortly after the november presidential election. this is an hour and half. >> one of the best things about sitting across from you is that, for all of us who have been part of the institute's staff, we are wondering what you been thinking, with this experience has been like for you over the last year-and-a-half, two years. so tonight, we get to hear for the first time your reaction to the campaign. >> thank you very much. i want to thank the in boyer for the support the university has given the institute politics, including making it possible for us to hire such extraordinary people like steve edwards and been restored and all of the other people -- and ben reeseberg and all the other people. [applause] you have been wondering what i have been doing and i have been wondering what you have been doing. [laughter] >> those who were disappointed by this outcome, the democrats elated by this outcome -- given the conventional wisdom around this campaign, the president's approval ratings that were barely above 50%, often dipping below it, the unemployment around 8%, gdp growth stock of arou
in the general election with the latinos, who he got blown out and provided a huge margin in the swing states. >> that is a good point, my point is, of course, the anonymous video operator, who captured the 47%, which is why we happen to have the tape. why it happened to be ready. now, the best move of 2012. what was the best move of 2012? >> this is really hard, because some part of me as a political junky thinks the best move is the crazy thing. and for that, i would give it to mitt romney actually moving across the stage and grabbing rick perry, this kind of physical debate style he also had that revealed him to be crazy and not driven by the same things that most humans are driven by. but sort of the competitive work force bought. but i think at tend of the day e keep going back to the 47% -- >> it is everything. >> the release of that. and the timing of that changed the contours of the race, forever. >> and we don't really know who is responsible for that timing. krytal, the best move. >> the best move, goes to the point about immigration, the president, when he gave a press conference s
. when newt was elected to office in 1978 in georgia, his party, like the republican today was in wilderness. jimmy carter occupied the white house and both the house and senate were safefully democrat hands. the election of president reagan in 1980, republicans took control bows the white house and the senate. in the house, where gingrich went to work each day, he was badly outnumbered. i worked as a hill staffer for a congressman who had an office steps away from newt's. can assure you for representatives like newt, the minority was off in a lonely place. the republicans hasn't held a majority there since 1956. there was not a soul alive that could imagine a republican majority again. oh. except for newt. [laughter] with no seniority, but a tireless work ethic, a vision, and a mind filled with idea, it was newt gingrich who sat in the back bench of congress and meth devised a -- once again. it was gingrich that devised the famous contract with america. the plan that gave republicans more than something to run against in the historic 1994 election. he gave them something t
together since the election. only with barbara walters. >> how do you keep the fire going? >>> trimming the trees with the first dog bo. inside a special tradition. how they deck the halls at 1600 pennsylvania avenue. >>> and ask mrs. obama. first graders with a very special connection to the white house tree ask their questions of the first lady. >> do they give each other presents? >>> from the global resources of abc news, with terry moran, cynthia mcfadden, and bill weir in new york city, this is "nightline," december 26th, 2012. >>> good evening, i'm terry moran. for a holiday, this has been a busy time in washington. as the negotiations surrounding that looming fiscal cliff come to a fever pitch just before the new year. but this is also a time of tradition and celebration in the nation's capital, and nobody decks the halls like the team at the white house for christmas. christmas is there, has come to mean a special visit every year, not just from santa claus, but from abc's own barbara walters. barbara? >> terry, in what has become one of my favorite holiday traditions for the f
think 56% compared to mr. boehner's 26% and what the public voted for in the last election. a lot of things the people don't realize is president is catching hell from the left, in other words, from people who believe in the congress that the cpi, cost of living, should not be reduced so that people on veterans benefits, disabilities benefits, social security benefits, the money is not reduced considering most of the people have nothing and only getting $15,000 to $16,000 a month in social security benefits. so with the president engaging in these discussions, she cannot say that he is not coming forth and doing all that he can. i think he is doing all he can and catching hell at the same time. so, again, there is some give, give. i don't agree with the slashing of any kind of benefits for social security, people on social security and medicare benefits but i also see that the president is trying to work a deal. >> congressman, speaker boehner also said to the president, you know, why not just give me the 2011 deal? 800 is that number there, 800 million. why not go back to that? e
. >> it was the will of the house to do nothing? on thursday night, the members of the elected house of representatives decided it would you describe not their will to take a vote on their own leadership's proposal. it would have exempted the first million dollars of income from a tax increase. there was no chance of being passed into law as the president made clear he would veto it. if the speaker's plan b passed the democrat controlled senate. this was a republican proposal. house democrats would not have supported it. democrats couldn't agree to vote on it. instead, they walked out and went home for the holidays. forget about bipartisanship, this house couldn't achieve partisanship. as the speaker explained it, his fellow republicans wouldn't vote on the proposal because they didn't want to be perceived as tax raisers. now, the speaker is at a loss. >> many of us believe on both sides of the aisle, the tax code will help us get our economy working faster and put more americans back to work and more americans with tax rules. how we get there, god only knows. >> god only knows? mr. speaker, you're supposed to
is these lawmakers were elected to make tough decisions and they haven't been able to do it it yet. >> if i may say so, it's also childish. thank you. >>> the longest-serving member of congress from massachusetts is the first to announce he'll run for john kerry's senate seat. ed markey was just elected to his 19th term with 76% of the vote. kerry, as you know, is president obama's pick to succeed hillary clinton as secretary of state. if and when he's confirmed, that senate job will pass to a replacement chosen by the massachusetts governor. then to a win ere of a special election a few months later. a regular election will be held in 2014 when kerry's term would have ended. >>> should teachers be armed in the classroom? big question, lots of answers. about 200 educators in utah are mulling that over today after attending classes on firearm use and safety. the course of geared toward teachers. instructors are not trying to persuade teachers to carry guns in schools, but to provide the information and training they need in the wake of the newtown massacre. the classes have been going on for some ti
the people who aren't willing to make a compromise. >> this is something we know that our elected leader haves to get done and don't have hope for getting something done is on gun control in this country, although the conversation still wages on. fresh in the news is the fact that four firefighters were basically used as target practice for this person in webster, new york. two were shot and killed on christmas eve in upstate new york. there's the suspect right there. william spangler spent time in prison for murdering his grandmother. he shouldn't be access to weapons at all. police say that he left a note behind saying he was doing what he liked to do best, killing. they think in the burned remains to find his sister. they have found human remains but they haven't said whether or not it is his spangler's sister or lot. lynn, the fact that we're talking about this, do we do it now through the prism of newtown? he had also a weapon, the ar-15 rifle, one of the weapons that spangler used. do we look at it through the prism of newtown? >> newtown, virginia tech, columbine, northern illinoi
to commu communicate with their elected representatives and let those elected representatives know that the people want to see a deal that is fair to the working and middle class people. that's what the president is saying. i think the president is correct to do so. and i think that the -- you know, that senator reid has been really clear. we should be there working hard to get a fair bargain. and i'm glad the president is basically turning up the temperature. >> see, that's what i read, melissa. i think that one was to update the public. but another is to say if they play passed the deadline, you get in touch with your senator because i'm going to have them call the roll. >> well, so, part of it is about that public pressure. but the other part of it, when the president calls on speaker boehner to do that, what he's saying is speaker boehner, put the good of the country before your job. the majority is all of the democrats and a few republicans, enough to get it through. but boehner, as a speaker, does not want to bring anything to the house floor for a vote that does not have a m
law school. he practiced law for some years and began his political career in 1968 when he was elected attorney general of missouri in his first place for public office. missouri voters elected him to the u.s. senate in 1976. they reelected him in 1982 and 1988, for a total of 18 years of service. the senator initiated major legislation in international trade, telecommunications, health care, research and development, transportation, and civil rights. he was later appointed special counsel by janet reno. he later represented the united states as u.s. ambassador to the united nations and served as a special envoy to sudan. he has been a great friend to missouri, st. louis, and washington university. please join me in welcoming him now. [applause] >> thank you. thank you very much. i owe our speaker an apology. when you hear the apology, you are going to conclude that i am a really terrible human being. i am the kind of person who takes advantage of a friend, especially a friend who is vulnerable. when he is vulnerable, i pounce. tonight's origin was a rehearsal dinner the night before t
and was postponed until now. it was the first time the couple sat down together since winning re-election. mrs. obama also took me on a personal tour of what is called the people's house. and it's never more true than during the christmas season. after thanksgiving, more than 80 volunteers from nearly 40 states descend on the white house, trimming 54 trees, plus every nook and cranny. first dog bo is the star of the show. there he is inspecting the decorations, including this larger than life model of himself, made of 20,000 pompoms. my friend. >> yes, bo. he's really big in relation to this house. >> this 300-pound ginger bread white house was the first stop on my exclusive behind-the-scenes tour with first lady michelle obama. these are various rooms in the actual white house. >> absolutely. and the details in these rooms are just beyond this year. >> why peer into these windows when i can see the real thing? >> come on, bo. >> does he follow you around all day? next stop, the red room. filled with cranberries and fruit trees. >> for christmas alone, we'll have more than 90,000 people come t
in bipartisan legislation. >> the speaker's no. 1 goal is to get elected speaker on january 3. >> reporter: the two sides are at odds over tax cuts and spending. republicans say it's up to the democratically controlled senate and white house to reach an agreement. >> republicans aren't about to write a blank check for anything senate democrats put forward just because we find ourselves at the edge of the cliff. >> reporter: members of the house were told to come back to washington sunday evening. they would have a little more than 24 hours to vote on a measure to avoid the fiscal cliff. danielle nottingham, cbs news, washington. >>> teetering on the fiscal cliff is given wall street a case of vertigo. the markets plummeted early, but the dow regained most of its 150-point lost. >>> a former bay area city councilman is about to learn first hand how washington works or doesn't. he's a newly elected congressman and heading into the capitol hill quagmire. juliette goodrich talked to stallwell about his plan to fix our fiscal ills. >> let's face it. you're the freshman walking in. >> reporter:
agricultural areas in the country. but kenya just months away from an election. experts say this is about power and money. >> it is really about politics and the forthcoming election. and it's about numbers. you have a grouping in which the community and the fight or the struggle or the contest for and political dominance as far as the next elections are concerned. >> what happened on friday is all too similar in villages in august and september. more than 100 people were killed and thousands were forced to leave their homes. it was the worst fighting since the election five years ago. poll -- the electoral commission have identified 27 hot spots around the country where they say there could be potential violence during the election. >> the conflict between these two warring communities could grow. >> to egypt now where there have been violent clashes between rival protestors in alexandria. the demonstrators square off on the constitution. the final vote on the draft is scheduled this saturday. >> buses and several cars were set on fire. they were -- belonged to the muslim brotherhood. the rall
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